Girls, make it count

Aussie sensation SUKHJIT KAUR KHALSA, who reached the semi-finals of Australia Got Talent, talks to youth in Malaysia.

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Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia | 11 June  2016 | Asia Samachar |
CALM AFTER THE STORM: Sukhjit Kaur (front row, centre) with students and staff of Sri Dasmesh International School in Kuala Lumpur after a poetry and chat session on 10 June 2016
CALM AFTER THE STORM: Sukhjit Kaur (front row, centre) with students and staff of Sri Dasmesh International School in Kuala Lumpur after a poetry and chat session on 10 June 2016

By Anandpreet Kaur and Prabhjeet Kaur

“Just because you’re young, doesn’t mean you can’t stand up for something you believe in.”

Inspiring words from a young lady and a spoken word poet. Meet Sukhjit Kaur Khalsa, 22, who shot to fame when she reached the semi-finals of Australia’s Got Talent. Not an easy feat, indeed.

She had just finished a session with a group of students and teachers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. How best to describe this young ‘ambassador’ for the minorities in Australia?

She is brave. She is confident. A bubble of happiness surrounds her, making you feel immediately comfortable around her.

“My name is Sukhjit Kaur. It means the winner of peace,” she introduced herself to the young audience at the Sri Dasmesh International School (SDIS), as she paced the room.

The Aussie girl is making a number of pit-stops in Malaysia en-route to a Sikh camp in Singapore.

After the speaking session at the school yesterday (10 June), she was whisked away for a luncheon session with the kids at the orphanage Gurpuri. In the evening, she had a poetry recital at the Chayo Cafe in Petaling Jaya. In the next two days, she will be having sessions at a Sikh camp in Kampung Pandan and a gurdwara in Subang Jaya.

How do you stand up for yourself? Sukhjit narrates a story from her life, an act of courage that brought profound change in her.

It was a nice, bright sunny day. The traffic light turned red and cars had stopped. Wearing a dress, she negotiated a pedestrian crossing. A man in a car cat called out to her. “You look so disgusting,” the driver said. He was referring to the hairy legs.

Sukhjit Kaur Khalsa poetry and chat session at Chayo Cafe in Petaling Jaya on 10 June 2016 - PHOTO / ASIA SAMACHAR
Sukhjit Kaur Khalsa poetry and chat session at Chayo Cafe in Petaling Jaya on 10 June 2016 – PHOTO / ASIA SAMACHAR

MEET SUKHJIT KAUR KHALSA:

11 June (Sat): Kampung Pandan mini samelan 8:30pm-10pm

12 June (Sun): Subang Darbar, 7.30pm-8.15pm

She was stunned and shocked. After what she termed as the ‘three seconds of courage’, she walked over to the man in the car. The driver was taken aback by her response.

She explained to him how his words didn’t affect her. It may have affected her if she was 15.  Back then, her self-confidence would not have allowed her to confront the driver, and she would have probably gone home all depressed inside.

Before she knew it, she was already confronting the driver. There was no turning back now. She had to make her point.

She lifted her leg through the car window. She showed him her hairy legs, proud of them.

“Touch it. Don’t be scared. My hairy leg is the same as your hairy leg,” she told him.

The light turns green. The driver was eager to leave, not wanting to prolong the matter. But Sukhjit stood her ground, wanting to make her point. She stood in front of the car and asked him to apologise.

What moved her to it? She not only wanted to stand up for herself but also the people around her, especially teenagers who are more vulnerable and easier to pick on. An event such as this could destroy a young woman’s confidence. But she had decided that it was not going to be so.

She wants all women to help each other, to embrace each other.

“Why do women hate each other when we should be standing up for each other?”

Really, if us women don’t stand up for each other and help each other rise, who else is going to stand up for us?

This makes sense. If we all do stand up for each other, we can change the stereotypical mentality buried deep within our society. Women should make the first move, we must stand up for ourselves.

“We have to love ourselves first because who else would love you like you do?” she said.

She spoke on a variety of issues. It was wonderful listening to her. It’s amazing how Sukhjit manages to take all these social issues and add some humour into them but still gets her point across.

Get ready to be inspired by the wonderful Sukhjit Kaur Khalsa! Join this girl from Perth on a mission to leave this earth better than we found it at our birth. Remember, if Sukhjit can do it, so can you.

[Anandpreet Kaur and Prabhjeet Kaur are students at the Kuala Lumpur-based Sri Dasmesh International School. They were thoroughly fired up by Sukhjit Kaur’s presence] 

 

[ASIA SAMACHAR is an online newspaper for Sikhs in Southeast Asia and surrounding countries. We have a Facebook page, do give it a LIKE. Follow us on Twitter. Visit our website: www.asiasamachar.com]

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